DRS 201

NOTE: The Below is from the 2018 Conference.

2019 Details Coming Soon!

 


 

DRS 201: Advanced Driver Rehabilitation Concepts

(12 CEH’s)
This track offers several diverse sessions geared to more established evaluators.


Continuing Education Contact Hours – The ADED course and seminars have been approved for CDRS contact hours. DRS 101 offers 15 contact hours and DRS 201 offers up to 12 contact hours. Credit hours will only be awarded to those attending sessions in their entirety; ADED does not offer partial credit. Contact hours available: 1 AOTA CE = 10 education hours earned. Information about signing in and how to claim credits at the end of sessions will be provided on site.


ADED is an AOTA Approved Provider of continuing education. The assignment of AOTA CEHs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA. Please see individual course descriptions for contact hours / AOTA CEHs offered and the Learning Level. AOTA Classification Code: Domain of OT: Areas of Occupation, OT Process Evaluation

  • Optimizing the Value of Driving Simulators in Rehabilitation Practice by Increasing Behavioral Validity

    Tuesday, March 6, 2018 - 8:30AM – 12:00PM (3 CEHs)

    Driving simulators are increasingly promoted as a means of increasing the objectivity, reliability and validity of driving assessments and the effectiveness of driver training. Behavioral validity is acknowledged as necessary for the successful application of driving simulation in rehabilitation practice. This session proposes that behavioral validity is the observable manifestation of psychological validity, also known as presence. Therefore, increasing presence will increase behavioral validity and the effectiveness of driving simulator-based applications. Key terms and concepts, i.e. behavioral validity, field of view, immersion, task fidelity, and presence, will be explained in relation to selected items from the CDRS in-vehicle assessment checklist. Methods for increasing and measuring presence during a driving simulator session will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives include: Describe a process model explaining how behavioral validity is increased by psychological fidelity, also called presence; Define and understand the context for presence in health care practice; Understand the factors that increase presence; Describe three keys to conducting a simulation session to increase presence; Understand methods for measuring presence

    Speakers: Pierro Hirsch, PhD & Laura Miear, M.S., OTR/L

  • It's Not Just Driving

    Tuesday, March 6, 2018 - 1:00PM - 5:15PM (4 CEHs)

    Abstract: This is an intermediate to advanced level course designed to promote thinking outside the book(s). Attendees should be familiar with and implementing the ADED Best Practice Guidelines for the Delivery of Driver Rehabilitation Services. This course is designed to encourage experienced providers to understand the functional impact that driving can have on our clients. Driver rehabilitation is a TEAM effort and requires careful analysis and balance of wants, needs, abilities, resources and limitations of the whole team. This course will be interactive and include video, photos, and a panel of actual driver rehab clients. The clients will have range of diagnoses that have resulted in physical, cognitive and/or behavioral health complications. The purpose of the panel is to provide the DRS with a real life retrospective and prospective case studies. The presenter will moderate discussions with the panel that will be designed to help the DRS: Identify gaps in your client interview; Anticipate barriers; Understand how driving impacts relationships; Develop holistic solutions / factoring the compromises; Predict subsequent outcomes; Learn from their mistakes. The course will explore “beyond” Best Practices and promises to provoke thought, validate importance of driving rehab services, and hopefully inspire growth.

    Learning Objectives include: Define Driver Rehab Team and list at least 5 members of that team; Explain the importance of a holistic approach to driving; Discuss the importance of collaboration with vendors and manufacturers; Describe two examples of compromises that outweighed the solution; List roles, responsibilities or duties, that client can resume by driving.

    Speaker: Tammy Phipps, MS, OTR/L, CDRS, MAJ (USAR Retired)

  • From Diagnosis to Driving - Low Tech modifications for Independence

    Wednesday, March 7, 2018 - 8:30AM – 10:30PM (2 CEHs)

    Abstract: This course is designed to introduce the clinician to various low-tech classroom and on road interventions to increase the potential for independence with driving. This course will focus on a variety of populations/diagnosis including ADD/ADHD, Autism, Anxiety, Cerebral palsy, Spina bifida and low vision to name a few. We will address different home programs prescribed to clients to promote independence, safety and success. Such independence can and will allow clients the opportunity to work, have increased social lives and to participate in leisure activities of interest. This course will also demonstrate the collaboration between payor source, the client, the Certified Driver Rehabilitation Specialist (CDRS) and the mobility vendor.

    Learning Objectives: The participant will be able to identify 3-5 home program activities related to independence with driving; Understand the role of the DRS/CDRS with a variety of age groups and impairments (physical, cognitive, visual); Become Familiar with the potential to drive assessment and various recommendations; Gain a knowledge and understanding of low vision diagnosis and modifications to assist in driving success.

    Speakers: Lea Bertoni, MS, OTR/L, DRS & Jill Sclease, CTRS, CDRS

  • "Look Ma, No Hands" A High Tech Case Study Analysis

    Wednesday, March 7, 2018 - 2:30PM – 5:30PM (3 CEHs)

    Abstract: This course is designed to provide an overview of various ways to think outside the box when working with different diagnoses. Advancements in technology are providing more opportunities for independent driving. This course will allow the generalist to identify the potential for someone with a disability to have the opportunity to be assessed for the potential of being a safe and independent driver. Various High Tech Driving case studies will be presented to assist attendee's in gaining a better understanding of modification options. Such independence can and will allow clients the opportunity to work, have increased social lives and to participate in leisure activities of interest. This course will also demonstrate the collaboration between payor source, the client, the Certified Driver Rehabilitation Specialist (CDRS) and the mobility vendor.

    Learning Objectives include: Apply basic driver rehabilitation principles and utilize creativity to promote driving independence in more unique cases; Gain a knowledge and understanding of customized adaptive driving equipment solutions; Understand the role of the DRS/CDRS with a variety of age groups and impairments (physical, cognitive, visual); Identify three types of adaptive driving equipment for independent and safe driving; Become Familiar with the extensive process of a high tech adaptive driving assessment and the importance of each person involved (Client, DRS/CDRS, Payor Source, Mobility Vendor).

    Speakers: Jill Sclease, CTRS, CDRS & Lea Bertoni, MS, OTR/L, DRS